Our Lawyers Help Victims Of Misdiagnosed Stroke

Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability and one of the leading causes of death in the United States. When recognized and treated quickly, the damage caused by a stroke can be reduced or avoided, and the likelihood of survival and recovery are significantly improved. Failure to diagnose a stroke can lead to further brain injury or death.

From Ohio and northern Kentucky offices, the medical malpractice lawyers at Crandall & Pera Law have helped countless victims recover compensation. Let us help you and your family hold the responsible parties accountable after a failure to diagnosis or misdiagnosis.

What Is A Stroke?

A stroke, also known as a cerebrovascular accident (CVA), is a condition in which blood flow to the brain is obstructed or diminished causing brain cell damage. There are three types:

  • Ischemic. Caused by a clot blocking blood flow to an area of the brain, these account for more than 80 percent of all strokes.
  • Transient ischemic attack (TIA). Often called a ministroke, TIAs tend to resolve on their own, usually in less than half an hour, but may indicate that a more serious stroke is likely to follow.
  • Hemorrhagic. These are caused by rupture of a cerebral blood vessel, causing an accumulation of blood that compresses and kills brain cells.

The symptoms of all three types of stroke are similar, and include: sudden unexplained and severe headache; weakness, heaviness, numbness, or paralysis of the face, arm or leg, often on one side of the body; difficulty speaking or finding words; difficulty understanding speech; sudden loss of vision or vision problems such as dimness, blurriness or double vision in one or both eyes; dizziness, loss of balance, loss of coordination, difficulty walking or fainting; and confusion.

Doctors Can Fail To Diagnose Strokes For Many Reasons

Doctors and other health care providers may overlook the possibility of stroke, even when some of the symptoms are present, because of:

  • An assumption that the patient is not at risk because of age or overall good health. This is a dangerous assumption, since stroke is possible at any age, especially if risk factors are present.
  • Inadequate evaluation of medical history. This is especially dangerous if the patient has a history of TIAs.
  • Failure to inquire about risk factors. There are a number of risk factors that every doctor should be aware of, regardless of how young the patient is (prior to a stroke or heart attack, including TIAs): high blood pressure, diabetes, carotid artery disease, atrial fibrillation, high cholesterol, intake of medications that increase the chance of stroke, and a family history of stroke.

Serious Consequences When Stroke Is Not Diagnosed Correctly

When a stroke is overlooked and a patient is sent home untreated or treated for a condition they do not have, precious time is lost and irreversible damage, additional strokes or death may result. Even when a person survives a stroke they may be left with chronic pain, loss of motor skills, paralysis, speech impairment, difficulty understanding words, diminished reading comprehension and writing ability, memory problems, behavioral changes, depression, difficulty eating or swallowing, and susceptibility to seizures.

Recovery from a stroke can be a long and difficult process. Many victims face long-term disability, lengthy rehabilitation process and major lifestyle changes. Chances for recovery and survival increase significantly when a stroke is diagnosed and treated immediately.

Helping You Respond To A Stroke Misdiagnosis

If you or a member of your family has suffered because of a hospital or medical professional's misdiagnosis and failure to treat a stroke, the Crandall & Pera Law team wants to help. We offer one-on-one counsel with our attorneys and staff throughout Ohio and treat you and your case with respect and dignity.

Dial our offices at 855-444-6651 or send a quick online message to set up a consultation with a passionate lawyer at one of our offices across Ohio and northern Kentucky, including in Cincinnati, Cleveland and Lexington.