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Meningitis Outbreak Causes Second Illness

Those recovering from the recent meningitis outbreak caused by a contaminated steroid drug may be at high risk for a second illness, according to The New York Times.

About a third of the 53 patients treated for meningitis at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor, Michigan have returned with an epidural abscess, an infection near the spine where the drug was injected to treat back or neck pain that causes severe pain.

Other affected locations across the country have reported patients infected with abscesses as well, even while these patients have been taking powerful antifungal medicines.

“This is a significant shift in the presentation of this fungal infection, and quite concerning,” says Dr. Lakshmi K. Halasyamani, the chief medical officer at St. Joseph Mercy Hospital. “An epidural abscess is very serious. It’s not something we expected.”

While many of these internal abscesses can be drained or cleaned out by a neurosurgeon, others may be wrapped around nerves that cannot be surgically removed.

“In such cases, all doctors can do is give a combination of antifungal drugs and hope for the best,” writes Denise Grady. “They have very little experience with this type of infection.” Read the full details here:

The fact that the deadly mistakes made by a U.S. drug manufacturer continues to inflict harm on patients is frightening to Steve Crandall, a top-rated medical malpractice attorney throughout Ohio and Kentucky.

“Spinal epidural abscesses are very lethal and can cause both paralysis and death,” says Crandall. “If anyone has a family member who had this drug injected, they should call an attorney immediately to protect their rights.”

If this or any other contaminated drug has impacted the life of someone in your family, please contact Steve Crandall of Crandall Law to discuss your legal rights.

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