With a growing number of initiatives to control health care costs championed in recent years, doctors are looking for patients to be more cost conscious.

Programs such as pay-for-performance, where doctors earn money by meeting quality “goals” like controlling patients’ high blood pressure, and accountable care organizations, where clinicians and hospitals in partnership are paid a lump sum to cover all care, are aiming to replace the current model in which doctors are reimbursed for every office visit, test or procedure performed.

While health professionals claim to be open to controlling costs, they cite the fact that they must also consider their patient’s opinions and willingness to be cost conscious when it comes to their own care as potential obstacles.

“We need to begin to talk about these issues in a way that doesn’t turn it into a discussion pitting money against life…” said Dr. Susan Dorr Gold, professor of internal medicine and health management and policy at the University of Michigan. “Because it’s going to be tough otherwise trying to implement any cost-saving measures, if patients don’t accept them.” Read the full details here:

Getting Patients to Think About Costs

Too often medical malpractice occurs as physicians do not order needed studies, tests or consultations out of fear of increasing costs. This can lead to delays in diagnosis, wrongful death and birth injuries in many cases.

If you or someone you love has been injured by medical malpractice, call the professionals at Crandall & Pera Law for a free consultation.