Nurses will be more in demand than ever when the Affordable Care Act goes into effect next year, but a lack of educators has led to a nationwide nursing shortage, according to a recent NBC News article. 

Nurses will take on the lion’s share of work when millions of Americans get health insurance for the first time starting in January. The nursing profession is a rare bright spot in the U.S. unemployment picture as graduates receive job offers even before they collect their diplomas.

But, due to a lack of professors – one study shows 1,181 faculty jobs open at 662 nursing schools – nursing schools are unable to crank out enough graduates with advanced degrees. According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, U.S. nursing schools rejected 75,587 qualified applicants from baccalaureate and graduate nursing programs in 2011.

Most nursing schools now want their instructors and professors to have doctoral degrees, but lower salaries are not drawing these professionals out of the medical field into teaching.

“Money is not in academia,” said Beatrice Kalisch, a distinguished professor at the University of Michigan. “And with states cutting budgets, staff have to take furlough days, so that cuts their pay even more. And you have to go into huge debt to get your degree, so it’s like, wow, why do all that?” Read the full story here:

‘Double whammy’: Nursing shortage starts in the classroom

A shortage of nurses and the faculty to train new nurses is a significant problem in the quality of healthcare. Many nurses opt for a 2-year degree rather than a more rigorous 4-year degree in order to enter the workforce sooner. This can result in inferior training for the nurses who care for us in the hospital.

If you or a family member believe you have a medical malpractice case, contact Crandall & Pera Law today for a free case evaluation. Crandall & Pera Law is available to help answer your questions and guide you in determining your next steps.