Even as the world’s most technologically advanced country, the United States is ranked 34th among developed countries when it comes to the rate of infant mortality, according to a recent article in The Columbus Dispatch.

Ohio, meanwhile, is currently ranked 43rd in the nation for the same statistic.

A strong link between infant mortality rates and socioeconomic factors such as poverty, poor education and racial disparities may be to blame for these unacceptable figures. Research strongly suggests that adverse economic or social experiences early in childhood can harm health and well-being many decades later.

In terms of infant-mortality rates, the best health care in the world cannot overcome the cumulative effect of poverty, the strain of racial disparity and inadequate education on mothers, families and their fragile infants.

To further improve infant-mortality rates in the United States, a woman’s health must be addressed long before pregnancy, according to Dr. John Barnard, president of the Research Institute at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Read the full details here:

Pediatric research: Deeper study is needed to reduce infant deaths

This article is good food for thought.

If you believe your child suffered a birth injury due to medical negligence, please call to investigate your matter fully. Crandall & Pera Law is available to help answer your questions and guide you in determining your next steps.