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Do anesthesia errors lead to malpractice claims?

On Behalf of | Aug 19, 2021 | Medical Malpractice

Anesthesia forever changed the way physicians perform surgeries. When placed under anesthesia, a patient feels no pain or even has any awareness about a surgery, a miraculous achievement possible even during organ transplants and other complex operations. While scores of patients go under anesthesia without any problems, accidents and catastrophes occur. Anesthesia mistakes could then lead to a malpractice claim in an Ohio courtroom.

Anesthesia errors and mishaps

The person responsible for providing a patient with anesthesia must deliver the appropriate, safe amount. Anesthesia errors that involve giving a patient the wrong amount could lead to fatalities.

The errors might not always be the health care provider’s fault, such as when a smoker doesn’t reveal he or she inhales 30 cigarettes a day. However, giving someone the wrong amount for his or her weight after getting an accurate weight assessment could be gross negligence.

Malpractice might take other forms, including responses to bad reactions. A patient could experience unexpected side effects to anesthesia. Not being able to predict the reaction might not be negligence, but failing to take appropriate steps to help the patient may be negligent behavior.

Filing a medical malpractice claim

Anesthesia mistakes could lead to awful complications for a patient. The person might suffer a permanent disability, organ problems, or even death. Even when the patient later makes a full recovery, he or she could suffer from the financial consequences. The malpractice incident may result in lost wages and extensive additional medical bills. So, it makes sense for the injury victim to seek compensation.

A medical malpractice lawsuit might lead to recovering losses. Sometimes, an insurance claim would suffice, and other situations may require suing the physicians and hospitals beyond the policy limits.

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