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Can I sue a hospital for a miscarriage in Ohio?

On Behalf of | Jan 21, 2022 | Hospital Negligence

Miscarriages are unfortunately common in Ohio. In fact, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, about 10-25% of all clinically recognized pregnancies will end in a miscarriage. If you have experienced a miscarriage and believe that it was caused by negligence on the part of your doctor or the hospital where you received treatment, you may be wondering if you can sue for damages. Here’s what you should know.

Can I sue a hospital for a miscarriage?

To sue a hospital for damages related to a miscarriage, you must be able to prove hospital negligence. Additionally, in order to recover damages related to your miscarriage, you must be able to prove that you suffered losses as a result of the miscarriage. This can include both economic and non-economic damages, such as pain and suffering.

What types of damages can I recover?

If you are successful in suing a hospital for damages related to your miscarriage, you may be able to recover both economic and non-economic damages. Economic damages may include medical bills, lost wages, and funeral expenses. Non-economic damages include pain and suffering, mental anguish, and loss of consortium.

It is important to note that the amount of damages that you may recover will vary depending on the facts and circumstances of your case. For example, if you had a condition that may have contributed to the miscarriage, a doctor may have noticed during examination but failed.

If you have experienced a miscarriage and believe that it was caused by negligence on the part of your doctor or the hospital where you received treatment, it is important to file a medical malpractice claim as soon as possible. The statute of limitations to filing medical malpractice claims is one to four years. But there are exceptions to this rule, like proving that you discovered evidence pertinent to your case at a late date.

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