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The relationship between shoulder dystocia and medical malpractice

On Behalf of | May 17, 2022 | Medical Malpractice

Shoulder dystocia is a serious medical emergency that can occur during childbirth in Ohio. If not treated properly, it can lead to permanent injury or even death of the baby. In some cases, shoulder dystocia may be the result of medical malpractice. If you believe that your child was injured as a result of medical negligence, you should understand the steps you need to take to protect your legal rights.

What is shoulder dystocia?

Shoulder dystocia occurs when the baby’s head has delivered, but one or both of the baby’s shoulders get stuck behind the mother’s pubic bone. This can happen because the baby is large, the birth canal is small, or there is excessive tissue around the baby’s neck (called a nuchal cord).

Shoulder dystocia is a serious medical emergency because it can cause the baby to suffer from oxygen deprivation, which can lead to brain damage or even death. In some cases, the baby may also suffer from a broken collarbone or other injuries.

When it’s a case of medical malpractice

Medical negligence can occur when the doctor or other health care provider fails to provide the standard of care that a reasonable health care provider would have provided under the same circumstances.

For example, if your doctor does not order a C-section when it is clear that the baby is too large to be delivered vaginally, and shoulder dystocia occurs as a result, you may have a case of medical malpractice.

You may also have a case of medical malpractice if the doctor or other health care provider fails to properly monitor the baby during labor and delivery, or if they fail to properly treat shoulder dystocia once it occurs.

If your child got injured as a result of medical negligence, you may be entitled to compensation for your child’s injuries, including medical expenses, pain and suffering and emotional distress. Just remember that you made need evidence to prove that the health care provider’s actions (or inaction) rose to the level of negligence. You’ll also need to show that your child got injured as a direct result of the negligence.

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